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Haiti

Will president or protesters yield?

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — The operation dubbed “Find Jovenel Moïse” organized by opposition leaders demanding the resignation of Haiti’s president ended abruptly when he appeared at the National Palace early this week following violent protests in which several people were killed.

Haitians had become so accustomed to not seeing their president in person amid a deepening political and economic crisis that his arrival at the palace Tuesday took protesters by surprise, with only a handful of them present to pelt his convoy with rocks.

Despite the rarity of his public appearances, the embattled leader has given no indication that he will step down after nearly a month of demonstrations against corruption, spiraling inflation and dwindling supplies of food and gasoline. Opponents have scheduled another protest for Wednesday, promising to once again paralyze Haiti’s capital and nearby communities if he doesn’t leave office.

As the standoff continues, Haitians wonder who will yield first: the protesters or the president.

“It’s a dramatic situation, a chaotic situation,” said Evans Paul, a former prime minister and Moïse ally who privately discussed the crisis Monday with the Core Group, which includes officials from the United Nations, United States, Canada, France and others.

Paul told The Associated Press that while those present did not say whether Moïse should remain in power or resign, they urged dialogue, voiced support for Haiti’s institutions and defended democratic principles, with Paul noting that Moïse was elected by the people in 2017 for a five-year term.

He also said government officials are outlining ways to exit the crisis. He believes Moïse has two options: choose a prime minister backed by the opposition or possibly reduce the length of his presidential term. However, Paul said many problems remain, including the lack of a provisional electoral commission.

After the meeting, Paul said, he met with Moïse to talk about the options and negotiations are continuing.

“He hasn’t said yes yet,” Paul said, adding that while he has encouraged Moïse to make bigger concessions, “he can’t put everything on the table.”

The opposition has rejected Moïse’s pick for a new prime minister, with a Sept. 23 vote being indefinitely postponed after a senator who said he was trying to protect himself from protesters fired his pistol outside Haiti’s Senate, injuring an AP photographer and a security guard.

If Moïse and key officials arrive at a solution, it will likely be announced by a non-partisan group instead of the president to lend it credibility and appease the people, Paul said.

Moise’s rare appearance Tuesday came a day after he presided over a meeting with a special council of ministers by phone, government spokesman Eddy Jackson Alexis confirmed to AP.

A spokesman for Moïse did not return a message for comment, and neither did officials with the U.S. Embassy in Haiti. A Canadian government official said no one was available for comment.

A spokesman for the United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti declined requests for an interview but issued a statement saying the mission was concerned about reports of violence and arson, seeks to have democratic processes respected and is working to encourage a peaceful resolution.

On the day the Core Group met, opposition leader and attorney André Michel tweeted that Haitians must remain mobilized until a president and interim government is installed: “We will not take orders from foreigners.”

Among those joining the opposition’s call for Moïse’s resignation is Paul Émile Demostine, an EMT who joined the protests and spoke near a barricade of burning debris.

“Ever since he became president, it’s been total misery,” Demostine said, adding that his children have been unable to go to school as a result of the protests. “We need Haiti to change completely.”

Protesters also are demanding a more in-depth investigation into allegations that top officials in the previous administration misused billions of dollars in proceeds from a Venezuela-subsidized oil plan. Critics accuse Moïse of trying to protect his ally, former President Michel Martelly, and of participating in the corruption himself before becoming president.

The protests have paralyzed the economy and closed down roads across the country, upending the supply chain and disrupting the distribution of food and gasoline, with long lines forming at a handful of gas stations and water kiosks that remain open.

“It’s an extremely serious situation,” said Haitian economist Kesner Pharel. “The political situation has been disastrous, and we are paying dearly for it.”

Prices have been rising in a country of nearly 11 million people where some 60 percent make less than $2 a day, he said. Inflation hit 19% in July, the latest number available, and economists predict it could be at 20% or higher in October, which would mark the first time that level since 2008, a situation that sparked food riots, Pharel said.

He also noted the fiscal year began Oct. 1 but the government has not yet approved a new budget, adding that this year could see a 1% contraction in the economy as the demographic rate increases.

“You’re going to have more extreme poverty,” Pharel said. “We have a very volatile situation.”

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Haïti – Actualité : Zapping…

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Haïti – Actualité : Zapping…
28/01/2020 11:31:42

Haïti - Actualité : Zapping...

JO Tokyo 2020 : Les USA invaincus affrontent nos Grenadières :

Ce mardi 28 janvier 2020 au BBVA Stadium de Houston, la sélection nationale féminine des États-Unis, qui a remporté 23 matchs d’affilés sans défaite, affrontera nos Grenadières en match d’ouverture de la dernière phase des éliminatoires du tournoi de football des JO Tokyo 2020. Par la suite, nos Grenadières dans le Groupe A affronteront le Costa Rica le 31 janvier et elles termineront cette première phase de Poule face au Panama le 3 février prochain. Lire aussi : https://www.icihaiti.com/article-29844-icihaiti-jo-tokyo-2020-j-4-avant-le-premier-match-des-eliminatoire-contre-les-usa.html

Pré-carnaval, 2 blessés par balle :

Dimanche à Port-au-Prince lors du 2e dimanche d’activité pré-carnavalesque, le Comité communal de Protection civile rapporte 2 blessés par balles (Bilan provisoire partiel).

St-Marc : Bavure policière :

En marge des activités carnavalesque de Saint-Marc (Artibonite), l’arrestation de deux individus connus comme Tchako et Zopoul de la « Base 7 secondes » a provoqué de violentes réactions de partisans qui ont jeté des pierres et bouteilles sur les policiers qui ont répliqué en faisant usage de leurs armes, alors que deux bandes à pied, Bon Bredjen et Fann Beton performaient dans le quartier. Bilan Enock Pierre (16 ans) a été touché mortellement et deux autres personnes Libelo Turin et Madsen Charles ont été blessés et transporté d’urgence à l’Hôpital Saint Nicolas

L’USAID soutient nos femmes entrepreneures :

« L’Ambassade des États-Unis est fière de soutenir via l’Agence Américaine pour le Développement International (USAID – Haïti) les formations de la la Chambre de Commerce de Femmes Entrepreneures d’Haïti (CCFEH) depuis 2017 […] car nous savons que l’investissement dans le leadership et l’autonomisation des femmes peut aider à briser les cycles de conflits et de violence qui menacent la sécurité et sapent les progrès du développement. » a déclaré Garry Juste, Directeur de Mission pour l’USAID.

Martine Moïse au Bélize :

Lundi la Première Dame, Martine Moïse à laissé le pays à destination du Belize pour participer à un forum organisé pour les jeunes autour du thème : « Adolescents et jeunes engagés pour le changement et un avenir durable ».

Coopération scientifique universitaire avec l’Espagne :

L’Ambassade d’Haiti près le Royaume d’Espagne se félicite des résultats très positifs de la rencontre du lundi 27 janvier 2020 avec les responsables de l’Université Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (ULPGC). Le futur de la coopération scientifique entre l’Université d’Etat d’Haïti et l’ULPGC est très prometteur. Bientôt, ULPGC accueillera nos étudiants et chercheurs haïtiens et vice-versa…

HL/ HaïtiLibre

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7.7 Magnitude earthquake hits Jamaica and Cuba – The Haitian Times

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Experts say a tsunami is possible following a major earthquake near Jamaica and Cuba

A powerful earthquake has struck in waters off Cuba and Jamaica, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The USGS said the quake had a 7.7 magnitude and hit at 2:10 p.m. ET about 70 miles southwest of Cuba and about 73 miles northwest of Jamaica.

Damage or injury reports were not immediately available.

Haitian Times

Haitian Times

The Haitian Times was founded in 1999 as a weekly English language newspaper based in Brooklyn, NY.The newspaper is widely regarded as the most authoritative voice for Haitian Diaspora.

Haitian Times

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Presidential Candidates Out of Election Race in Guyana Because of Dual Citizenship

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(left to right) United Republic Party candidate Dr Vishnu Bhandu; the People’s Republic Party candidate, Dr Valerie Leung; and Lenox Shuman, the candidate for the Liberty and Justice Party will not be able to contest the March 2 general and regional elections.

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Friday January 24, 2020 – Presidential
candidates for three of the 13 political parties contesting upcoming elections
in Guyana have been barred from throwing their hats into the ring.

Lenox Shuman, the candidate for the Liberty
and Justice Party; United Republic Party candidate Dr Vishnu Bhandu; and the People’s
Republic Party candidate, Dr Valerie Leung will not be able to contest the
March 2 general and regional elections because they had dual citizenship at the
time of their declaration on Nomination Day, January 10, says the Guyana
Elections Commission (GECOM). The latter two have US citizenship while Shuman
is a Canadian citizen.

Although Dr Bhandu is now no longer a US
citizen, his certificate of relinquishment of that citizenship was dated
January 16 – six days after Nomination Day – while Shuman has not yet received
approval to give up his citizenship.

As reinforced by a court ruling last year,
the Guyana Constitution prevents anyone who has sworn allegiance to another
country from sitting in the 65-member National Assembly. The ruling had forced
resignations from both the government and opposition benches.

GECOM Commissioner Robeson Benn said that as a result of the discovery that the three had made “false declarations in respect of their dual citizen status”, they could face legal action as it is considered a misdemeanour punishable by up to a year in prison.

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