Connect with us

Haiti

UN Calls for Urgent Action to Curb Rise in Hunger and Obesity in Latin America and the Caribbean

Published

on

NEW YORK, United
States, Wednesday November 13, 2019
– Since 1975, adult obesity in Latin
America and the Caribbean region has tripled, while one in four are going
hungry, according to figures published by the United Nations yesterday.

And the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations (FAO), the Pan American Health Organization / World Health Organization
(PAHO / WHO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food
Programme (WFP), have called for countries in the region to develop urgent
actions to address the increase in malnutrition.

The report, Panorama of Food and Nutritional Security 2019,
highlights the need to promote healthier food environments through taxes and
incentives that favour healthy food, social protection systems, school feeding
programs and the regulation of food advertising and marketing. The agencies also
stress the importance of improving food labeling with frontal nutritional
warning systems, ensuring the safety and quality of food sold on the street,
and reformulating the composition of certain products to ensure their
nutritional contribution.

According to the report, the most significant increase in
adult obesity in the region was observed in the Caribbean, where the percentage
quadrupled, rising from 6 per cent in 1975 to 25 per cent, an increase in
absolute terms from 760,000 to 6.6 million people.

“The explosive increase in obesity –which affects 24 per
cent of the regional population, about 105 million people, almost double the
global level of 13.2 per cent– not only has huge economic costs, but also
threatens the lives of hundreds of thousands,” said the FAO’s Regional
Representative, Julio Berdegué.

According to Panorama, every year 600,000 people die in
Latin America and the Caribbean due to diseases related to poor diets, such as
diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Inadequate diets are
associated with more deaths than any other risk factor, something that
threatens our future generations, since the rates of both childhood and
adolescent obesity have tripled between 1990 and 2016.

“We must act now to reverse this trend and prevent children
from suffering the consequences of poor diets on their health and their future
quality of life,” said PAHO/WHO Director Carissa F. Etienne.

“To achieve this, we need the commitment of the whole
society and public policies that regulate unhealthy food products, create
environments conducive to physical activity and promote healthy eating at
school and at the family table.”

The publication highlights that the region is worse than the
rest of the world in the majority of malnutrition indicators related to
excessive calorie intake: overweight has doubled since the 1970s, and today
affects 59.5 per cent of adults in the region, 262 million people, while
globally the rate is 20 percentage points lower: 39.1 per cent.

In contrast, the region has lower undernourishment rates
than the world (6.5 per cent for the region versus 10.8 worldwide), stunting (9
per cent versus 21.9), and much lower rates of wasting (1.3 per cent, versus
7.3 for the world). However, the agencies warn of the worrying increase in hunger,
which has grown again by 4.5 million people since 2014 –an increase of 11 per
cent– reaching 42.5 million in 2018, its highest point of the last decade.

The Panorama makes a detailed analysis of how the food
environment of the region has changed, understood as the space of interaction
between people and the physical, economic, political and socio-cultural
conditions that influence the way they acquire, prepare and consume food.

Sales of ultra-processed food products are the fastest
growing in Latin America and they increase the population’s exposure to
excessive amounts of sugar, sodium and fat. Between 2000 and 2013, the
consumption of ultra-processed products grew by more than 25 per cent, and fast
food consumption grew almost 40 per cent.

“In Latin America and the Caribbean, too many children eat
too little healthy food and too much processed food,” said Bernt Aasen, UNICEF
Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean. “Almost 1 in 5 children
under 5 are malnourished or overweight, which prevents them from growing well.
It is everyone’s task to ensure healthy food is available and affordable for
all families, especially the most vulnerable.”

The expansion of supermarket chains and the preponderance of
large food processing industries is another major change in the regional food
environment, one which has made ultra-processed products available everywhere,
and at lower prices than nutritious food. Poor people have been hardest hit by
these changes, since for this population group it is often easier and cheaper
to access unhealthy rather than healthy food.

“If we expand social protection programmes in our
region, we would better face the double burden that hunger and obesity
represent for communities and families,” said WFP Regional Director Miguel
Barreto. “These are the two faces of malnutrition.”

Social protection programmes today cover more than 200 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean, including 85 million schoolchildren who receive breakfast, snacks or lunch.

Click here to receive news via email from Caribbean360. (View sample)

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

Guyana President Optimistic of Favourable ICJ Ruling in Border Case Against Venezuela

Published

on

By

President David Granger

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Friday December 6, 2019 – President David Granger is optimistic that the International Court of Justice (ICJ) will dispense a ruling in Guyana’s favour in the border case with Venezuela.

He expressed these sentiments yesterday while appearing on the popular radio programme, Hot Seat.

“We hope that we will get a judgement and we are confident that we will be getting a very favourable judgement in a very short time,” Granger said, adding that the issue had been a “monkey on our backs for the last half-century”.

“The territorial question has a lot to do with our petroleum exploration, the lineation of our maritime frontiers and seeking the court’s reassertion of the agreement of 1899 which clearly demarcated our borders.”

The vast area west of the Essequibo River makes up two-thirds of the territory of Guyana and has been claimed by Venezuela as its own since the 19th century, when Guyana was still a British colony. The international Arbitral Award of October 1899 settled the Venezuelan claim, firmly defining the disputed territory as belonging to Guyana.

But Venezuela contends that the Arbitral Award was null and void, and its claim on Guyana’s territory has been renewed since ExxonMobil made its first world class oil discovery offshore the CARICOM nation.

Despite the dispute, President Granger said Guyana has been fulfilling its humanitarian mandate by facilitating Venezuelan migrants crossing the border to escape the socio-economic turmoil in their homeland.

He stressed that he did not view the migrant situation as a threat to Guyana’s territorial integrity.

“Should there be a military threat, I am very confident that the defence forces will be capable of deterring aggression,” Granger said.

The ICJ will begin hearing arguments in March 2020 on whether it has jurisdiction over the case filed by Guyana as it relates to the Arbitral Award of 1899.

Click here to receive news via email from Caribbean360. (View sample)

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

iciHaïti – Social : Politique nationale de protection et de promotion sociales

Published

on

By



iciHaïti – Social : Politique nationale de protection et de promotion sociales
07/12/2019 09:18:04

iciHaïti - Social : Politique nationale de protection et de promotion sociales

Jeudi 5 novembre, des représentants du Ministère des Affaires Sociales et du travail et du Programme Alimentaire Mondiale (PAM), ont présenté le document relatif à la Politique Nationale de Protection et de Promotion Sociales (PNPPS), aux responsables et cadres du Fonds d’Assistance Économique et Sociale (FAES).

Il s’agissait pour les intervenants de recueillir les points de vue des participants sur la PNPPS qui vise d’ici 2040 à réduire en Haïti, des inégalités et des injustices économiques, sociales et institutionnelles pour construire une citoyenneté sociale juste.

Saluant l’élaboration et la présentation du document, Charles Ernest Chatelier, le Directeur Général du FAES, a assuré les représentants du Ministère et du PAM que son Ministère produira par écrit, ses commentaires, remarques et suggestions dans le cadre de la finalisation du document de Politique nationale de protection et de promotion sociales, dont l’élaboration est le produit de la participation de tous les acteurs étatiques, des organisations nationales et internationales et des partenaires financiers œuvrant dans le domaine de la protection sociale en Haïti.

IH/ iciHaïti

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

Sony Michel’s Custom Cleats Will Support ‘Be Like Brit Foundation’ – CBS Boston

Published

on

By

BOSTON (CBS) – When the Patriots take the field against the Chiefs Sunday, their feet will speak volumes about what’s in their heart. The NFL’s “My Cause My Cleats” campaign gives them a chance to raise awareness and money for specific charities.

One player is making a big difference for a local family that’s channeled their pain into helping children in Haiti.

“I was screaming! I could not believe it! I think I blacked out to be honest with you,” said Cherylann Gengel.

She couldn’t believe the man on the phone was Patriots running back Sony Michel letting her know that the cause on his cleats this Sunday is the charity named in her daughter’s memory.

Sony Michel’s Be Like Brit cleats (WBZ-TV)

“The fact that he chose us, the Be Like Brit Foundation, to donate his cleats to? We’re over the moon!” she said.

“There are a lot of great organizations out there. But this one hit home with me because I’m Haitian,” Michel said. “The background. The story behind it is incredible.”

Britney Gengel was killed 10 years ago in Haiti’s devastating earthquake. She was there working with kids, and her dream to build an orphanage there became her parents’ mission.

Britney Gengel (WBZ)

“Ten years later we’re very lucky to say that we’ve built that orphanage and we have 66 beautiful children and amazing people have helped us on this journey,” Gengel said.

Including Michel, who hopes his cleats, featuring Haiti’s flag, have a purpose beyond the turf.

Patriots RB Sony Michel (WBZ-TV)

“To spread awareness so people know to get out there and help, donate and be a part of something special,” Michel said.

Something that helps people heal.

“It just brings a big smile to my face,” Gengel said.

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Trending