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Sandals Grenada: Now Hiring – Banquet Manager

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The Caribbean’s Luxury Included chain offers the opportunity for enthusiastic persons to join our team. Come share with us an exciting journey as a:

BANQUET MANAGER

This person is accountable for the overall execution of all aspects of banquet and conference requirements as outlined by the Director of Sales, Groups & Conventions and as required by signed group contracts and other agreed requirements.

DUTIES & REQUIREMENTS:

  • Acts as resort liaison for planning and executing group functions with the Convention Services Manager and Food & Beverage
  • Ensures clear communication of client’s expectations for proper event execution
  • Liaises with Director of Food & Beverage regarding provision of services and the adequate staffing for group & banqueting functions
  • Gathers event details and directs staffing guide for execution of logistics
  • Communicates a 30-day forecast of upcoming functions with weekly updates
  • Facilitates weekly banquet meetings
  • Ensures adequate stock levels specific to executing group events are kept and, minimum par levels to replace worn or broken equipment. This stock is including but not limited to tables, chairs, table cloths, glasses, linen, centrepieces and non-kitchen items functions require
  • Ensures on-the-spot support to client during all events to ensure all is going as planned, and to anticipate and intercept foreseen issues. The Banquet Manager is the point person during events
  • Post events, the Banquet Manager ensures full breakdown of site/s and makes note of any inventory items needed for repair or replacement and, that rented items are returned as received
  • Submit reports as required
  • Ensures preparation and implementation of weekly and monthly work schedules as dictated by group business
  • Prepares periodic inventory reports for Director of Food & Beverage 

QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE:

  • Food & Beverage NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications), SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) and HNDs (Higher National Diplomas)
  • First degree in Hospitality or any other related discipline a distinct advantage
  • Strong leadership skills and ability to multi-task
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Excellent customer service skills

If successful, a clean Police Record will be required. Interested persons should submit their applications by 27 September 2019 with curriculum vitae (CV) via email to:

The Recruitment and Compliance Specialist
Sandals Grenada
recruitsls@grp.sandals.com

NB: Please enter “Name of Position” in the subject field in the email for consideration. We thank all applicants for their interest but only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.


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Caribbean & World

Ongoing efforts to resolve Boca Secondary school’s electrical problem

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by Curlan Campbell, NOW Grenada 

  • On 18 November, three schools temporarily closed for sewer and electrical issues
  • Boca Secondary school’s electrical problems ongoing since 2004
  • Parents asking about alternative arrangements to accommodate students

A concerned parent affected by the recent closure of Boca Secondary School for the second time since school reopened in September, has spoken out on the issue. Martin Redhead’s son attends the Boca Secondary but has been home like many other children due to ongoing efforts to resolve the school’s electrical problem.

On 18 November, the Ministry of Education issued a release notifying the public of the temporary closure of three schools: Boca Secondary, St Andrews Special Education and Grenville Pre-Primary. While an electrical problem was cited as the cause for the temporary closure of Boca Secondary, the other schools were closed due to sewer problems.

Martin Redhead concerned over the closure of the Boca Secondary School

Redhead said he was among parents who phoned the Ministry of Education requesting an update on the progress of work being done, but without success. He stated that upon a further inquiry he was told that the electrical problem has been an issue after Hurricane Ivan in 2004. “We are concerned because our children are losing out in terms of the continuation of their education…I was told that since Hurricane Ivan there was this electrical problem…that is a very long time for which this problem has not been resolved and I will like to know…what has caused this delay,” he said.

Redhead asked about alternative arrangements to accommodate students if the problem cannot be addressed in the soonest possible time. “I am appealing to the authority, particularly the Ministry of Education to get this matter resolved. If it is that they cannot resolve this matter, then they will have to get an alternative place to put the children,” he said.

Efforts by NOW Grenada to get information regarding the expected duration of the work to be done in the schools were also unsuccessful.

NOW Grenada paid a visit to Boca Secondary on Thursday, 21 November where workers attached to Western Electronics Inc were seen finishing up work on the school’s electricals attached to the main circuit breaker. One electrician said that work has been completed and that power can now be restored to the building by Grenlec, but was unable to confirm a time for reconnection.

NOW Grenada is not responsible for the opinions, statements or media content presented by contributors. In case of abuse, click here to report.

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Maradona announces return two days after quitting

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Argentina legend Diego Maradona says he is to return as manager of Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata – two days after he quit.



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A Letter to Parents: International Education and Your Child’s Success

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Op-Ed by Ambassador Linda Taglialatela, US Ambassador to Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and the OECS

As we celebrate International Education Week, I would like to highlight the many benefits an international education has to offer.

Through increasingly globalised classrooms and international exchange, students experience new perspectives, work with diverse peers, and communicate across cultures and languages. In a 2017 survey by the Institute of International Education, 78% of respondents said that their previous study abroad experience helped them get their current job.

American and Caribbean students both enjoy opportunities at each country’s campuses. Last June, I joined a group of six Americans from Indiana University who attended the University of the West Indies (UWI) Cave Hill campus to discuss advanced theories of global human resource management with their Barbadian counterparts. For the past two years, these two universities have jointly organised this summer course to share best practices and increase mutual understanding.

Often, international alumni are the catalysts for these types of initiatives. Prime Minister of Grenada Dr The Right Honorable Keith Mitchell, who received a Masters degree from Howard University and a Doctorate from American University, also taught mathematics as a professor at Howard. Dr Cardinal Warde, a Barbadian who attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1980s and now teaches there, has set up Computer Coding Workshops in the Caribbean to inspire young people to study Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). They are but a few examples of an international alumni network that ties our countries together.

Parents across the region should consider the opportunities that international education offers. Studying abroad in the United States is well worth the investment for your children. Fourteen of the top 20 best universities in the world are in the United States, with more than 4,700 accredited schools in all. More than one million international students from around the world study in the United States each year. They pursue four-year degrees, two-year degrees, or complete short-term programmes.

Students feel at home in the United States. Two of the cities with the largest Caribbean diaspora are New York and Miami, and many educational institutions in and around those cities host Caribbean students. However, I am equally excited to hear about students’ experiences in Oklahoma or Montana, for example, and the stories they tell of their schools, communities, and representing their country in an environment that is sometimes less familiar with their culture.

American universities work closely with the private sector to adapt their curriculum to the needs of a modern economy and provide the most advanced and practical preparation for opportunities in a global world. US institutions also partner with civil society organisations and the public sector to prepare graduates for onward placement. The networks go further, into academia in and outside the United States, multiplying the number of avenues available to the newly graduated international student.

Finally, and not least important, the United States and our Caribbean partners share a commitment to an education system that respects and encourages independent thought. On any US campus, a student can choose from hundreds of activities, from sports teams, debate groups, and dance troupes to diverse political and religious associations. They can engage in frank and honest dialogue. Both inside and outside the classroom, students can challenge and be challenged without concern of government persecution, interference, or censorship.

Studying in the United States is an incredible opportunity that will open doors and unlock your child’s potential. If you are interested, talk to our EducationUSA advisors. These dedicated individuals help parents and students across the region search for the perfect university to match their interests and work to identify scholarship opportunities – all for free!

If you would like to make an appointment, please email BridgetownIRC@state.gov, and visit bb.usembassy.gov. There’s a good chance the advisor is located at your public library or community college. I encourage you to pay them a visit.

NOW Grenada is not responsible for the opinions, statements or media content presented by contributors. In case of abuse, click here to report.

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