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Petit Martinique students and community learn more about Seabirds

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Petit Martinique students learn about seabirds during a presentation by the organization Environmental Protection in the Caribbean (EPIC).

As part of the project Conservation of Key Offshore Island Reserves, Environmental Protection in the Caribbean (EPIC) is committed to teaching younger generations about biodiversity issues in the Grenadines, especially seabirds and their role in the marine ecosystem. On the 21st and 22nd of November 2019, Project Coordinator/Seabird Biologist Juliana Coffey gave two presentations at the Petite Martinique Roman Catholic Primary School, accompanied by Project Assistant Quincy Augustine of Grenada and Seabird Monitor/Captain Vaughn Thomas of Carriacou. Additional community members joined the group to learn about this topic of local concern.

The students were particularly attentive and engaged, expressing amazement at the unique features and abilities seabirds possess, for example, having webbed feet, waterproof feathers and raising only one chick per year. They were also astonished to see how well seabirds are able to cope with the everyday struggles of survival, such as being able to drink saltwater and migrate astonishing distances. They listened as elders discussed how they use certain seabirds to find fish and to understand weather patterns.  Upon learning that most seabirds mate for life, one adult present exclaimed “I didn’t know before that seabirds have their soulmates!”.

The facial expressions and excitement of the children when shown videos of seabirds swimming to great depths in order to catch fish was a joy to see. They were most impressed by seeing clips of seabirds “flying” underwater amongst other top predators, such as sharks and whales.  They were also able to recognize the common local seabirds around their island using local names, and even to mimic the calls the seabirds made.

However, the students expressed concern when they heard of the tremendous challenges seabirds face on a day to day basis, in the air, on the land and in the sea, and that there are less seabirds than there used to be. Among those threats, egg poaching and fires set by people created a stir among the students, with one questioning as to why people would do such a thing. When asked how we can protect seabirds in the region, they discussed protecting seabird habitat, stop polluting the oceans and not to harvest seabirds, their chicks and eggs anymore.

In closing, the principal of the school urged each student to make it their duty to save seabirds and encouraged them to educate their family members of how important seabirds are to our environment and even our daily survival.  He advised the students that although they are still young, someday they will have children and grandchildren who should have the opportunity to see seabirds in the future. Students were also informed of the many great careers they can have that involve seabirds, such as fisherfolk, biologist, sailor, and tour operator, and provided with seabird identification cards, book and posters for further education.

To learn more about this project please contact Juliana Coffey, Project Coordinator and at [email protected], on WhatsApp 1-709-770-6877 or phone 1-473-422-9547.

This project is made possible through funding from USAID and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Caribbean & World

Grenada Ports Authority mandatory curfew notice

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The Grenada Ports Authority will operate daily from 8 am to noon.

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Caribbean & World

A Different View… Shifting your emotions!!

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by Judy M McCutcheon

I was reading an article by the Tony Robbins team, and it really resonated with me. They were talking about the words we are using to describe our current situation.

Let’s take the words quarantine and lockdown as examples. The word quarantine brings to mind the images of people with the disease leprosy, who were quarantined and locked away from society. And what about lockdown? Does it conjure up the image of being in prison? In prison, the term lockdown is used to keep prisoners in their cells to prevent a riot. It’s where even the limited freedom in the jailhouse yard is taken away.

Tony Robbins says, “It’s time to wake up and become conscious of the patterns that are currently shaping the way you feel.” The meaning of words affects the way we feel, and those emotions alter our decision-making process. Currently, we are all trying to come to grips with what is happening. My daughter is in 5th form and should be getting ready for CXCs. Is that going to happen, who knows. Are kids going to be able to go back to school for the rest of the school year? Only time will tell.

I see a lot of memes going around on social media about husbands having a hard time being at home with their families, especially their wives. As funny as those memes may be, they affect us on a psychological level, due to the negative connotation attached to them. So, instead of looking at this time as a period of utter punishment, let’s look at it as a crucible, where we create something new and beautiful. Let’s make that psychological shift and view this as a period of “newness” or one of “conscious continuation.”

Many of us have a variety of unfinished projects sitting around the house just yearning for us to finish them, and we’ve always been complaining about not having sufficient time to do so. Well look at that, now you have lots and lots of time. Use this time to be creative; finish or start that book, start a kitchen garden. Who knows what’s going to be the situation with food in the coming months. For some of us, we could start a business. Let us see opportunities in this situation, instead of fussing that you have to spend time with your kids.

Let’s flip the switch on the words we are using to describe our current situation. I love meditation, so for me, this is an ideal time for me to connect with myself on a deeper level. This helps me to be more aware, and it keeps me calm. I’ve noticed that I am kinder and gentler both to myself and others. I am also using this time to go running and just enjoy and appreciate what nature has given us. It is a time to be centred and grounded so that we can face whatever lies ahead with ease and grace.

What about you? Are you going to use this time to tap into your humanness so that you get to experience the expansiveness of love, joy, and connectedness? What about using the time to dream, to plan, to create, so that after this is over, you can execute. Shifting your emotional patterns is a sure way to help you make better decisions and plans for your life. Challenge yourself to change your narrative during this time and experience the sheer joy that comes with living consciously.

©All Rights Reserved.

Judy McCutcheon is a partner in the firm Go Blue Inc, a Human Development Company. www.goblueinc.net

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Grenlec apologises for unexpected islandwide outage on 31 March 2020

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Grenlec apologises to customers throughout mainland Grenada for an islandwide outage that occurred on the morning of 31 March.

The initial outage was caused by a generator tripping at our Queen’s Park Power Plant, which resulted in several areas losing power. While restoring power, another unit tripped resulting in an islandwide outage.

Contrary to some accounts we have observed on social media, this morning’s outage was not related to a fuel shortage or major system failure of any unit or system.

We wish to assure you that our teams are working around the clock and going to extraordinary lengths at this time to ensure that you have the electricity supply you need.

Please continue to follow us on our Facebook page for official information and contact us at telephone number 237 for emergencies.

Grenlec

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