Connect with us

Haiti

New Action Plan Calls for Health to be Front and Centre of Climate Change Planning in the Caribbean

Published

on

Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Dr Carissa F. Etienne.

CASTRIES,
St Lucia, Tuesday May 14, 2109
– An Action Plan
has been developed by countries and territories of the Caribbean, establishing a
roadmap to ensure that health is front and centre of national climate change
planning in the region.

The ‘Caribbean Action Plan on Health and Climate
Change’ focuses on protecting the health of Caribbean populations from the
effects of climate change, such as heat waves, storms, hurricanes, droughts,
floods, outbreaks of disease, and other issues, by strengthening health
systems, promoting intersectoral collaboration between the health and
environment sectors, and increasing financing.

In order to achieve this, countries and territories
of the Caribbean have agreed to take national and regional actions to
strengthen educational and research capacities on climate change and health; to
build climate-resilient health facilities throughout the region; to improve
health surveillance; and to develop weather and climate-related preparedness,
response and recovery plans.

The Action Plan was launched earlier this month by
the Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Dr Carissa F.
Etienne, during a meeting with the Minister of Health of Grenada, Nickolas
Steele, and other high-level officials in Comfort Bay Home for the Elderly, a
facility that forms part of PAHO’s SMART initiative, supporting member states
to become more climate resilient, in St. Lucia.

“Climate change is one of the greatest threats
to the future of our islands and the health of our people,” said Dr
Etienne. “To this day, many islands are still recovering from hurricanes
Harvey, Irma and Maria which, as we all know, caused devastation of epic
proportions in 2017. It is our responsibility to place health in the climate
change agenda.”

The plan is the regional outcome of the World
Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change’s (UNFCCC) Special Initiative on Climate Change and Health in Small
Island Developing States. It was developed and approved during the Third Global
Conference on Health and Climate Change: Special focus on Small Island
Developing States in Grenada, in October last year, which was attended by 14
Caribbean Ministers of Health and Environment.

The Action Plan highlights the need to facilitate
access to climate and health financing mechanisms and proposes a series of
measures, including strengthening capacities and coordination to access
resources at a regional level, and developing mechanisms to implement
multi-country projects on climate change and health.

“We know that there are funds available to
promote climate resilience. We must ensure that health issues are included in
every climate change project submitted to these funding mechanisms,” said
the PAHO Director.

During the ceremony, Minister Steele thanked PAHO
for its support and leadership in climate change and health and assured Dr
Etienne that he would continue to support the action plan and that he would
encourage other governments in the Caribbean to do the same. He highlighted the
experiences of Dominica, which show how years of development can be destroyed
in just a few hours. For this reason it is vital that the Region acts now to
become more resilient to climate change and protect future generations.

Dr Etienne highlighted that due to its location,
the Caribbean will likely continue to face increased exposure to
climate-related disasters. Not only could these events have a direct impact on
health systems and facilities, but they could also lead to “increased
vulnerability to diseases; stress on freshwater supplies; and economic decline
in vital sectors – such as tourism, agriculture and fisheries.”

She emphasized that the organization stands ready
to support countries to implement the actions proposed in the Caribbean Plan.
“We have been working incessantly to provide capacity building and
technical support for the development of Health National Adaptation Plans, to
identify adaptation needs in the health sector, and to address health system
vulnerabilities,” she said.

The Special Initiative on Climate Change and Health
in Small Island Developing States (SIDS), was launched in 2017 at the 23rd
Conference of the Parties (COP-23) of the UNFCCC in Bonn, Germany. The
initiative responds to requests by SIDS and recognized their unique vulnerabilities
to climate change.

The initiative began with the III Global Conference
on Health and Climate Change: Special Focus on SIDS, in 2018, which was held in
the Pacific (Fiji), the Indian Ocean (Mauritius) and the Caribbean (Grenada).

The vision of the initiative is to ensure that by 2030, all SIDS health systems are resilient to climate variability and change.

Click here to receive news via email from Caribbean360. (View sample)

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

Haiti needs U.S. to care | Editorial

Published

on

By

Life has never been easy in Haiti, and that may be why the current nightmare there is not getting more attention. For about seven weeks now, a struggle between President Jovenel Moïse and the opposition has fed a storm of violent demonstrations, burning tires, looting and arson, all but shutting down transportation, schools, gas stations and medical services and leaving at least 30 dead.

The ostensible goal of the demonstrations is the ouster of Mr. Moïse, a businessman who came to power in 2017 after a two-round election plagued by accusations of fraud and a meager turnout. Before that, he had been involved in a scandal over whether he received funds for road repairs that never took place, allegations he denies. He refuses to step down, and few Haitians have put forward any ideas on who or what should come next, or how Haiti can pull itself out of its tailspin.

At the heart of the crisis is a broad despair that the existing political and economic system has not overcome the rampant corruption, spiraling inflation, food and drinking water scarcities, lawlessness and endless other indignities that have steadily worsened the lives of people in the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and one of the poorest in the world. The country has had at least 10 presidents since its first democratic election in 1990; only three have completed five-year terms.

Compounding the misery is a sense that nobody cares. During the Cold War, the United States tacitly supported the dictatorships of François Duvalier and his son Jean-Claude Duvalier because of their anti-Communist stance, and in the 1990s Washington first propped up and then helped force out the first democratically elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

After a horrific earthquake in 2010, in which more than 200,000 people lost their lives and tens of thousands of buildings were destroyed, many countries and organizations responded with generous aid and teams of rescue and medical workers. A United Nations peacekeeping mission set up in 2004 provided a modicum of stability, but it was also blamed for bringing cholera to Haiti, and dozens of its peacekeepers were involved in sexual abuse scandals. The last of the United Nations peacekeepers recently departed, contributing to the current lawlessness.

In the present crisis, protesters have accused the United States of standing by Mr. Moïse, who curried favor with the Trump administration by turning against Haiti’s former patron in Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, the leftist president the administration is trying to oust. In fact, the American “support” has consisted solely of limp calls for “dialogue.” Haiti has been on the receiving end of Donald Trump’s ill will, which has been focused in migrants and the movement of drugs, most notably when he said in 2018, among other crude things: “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.”

Register for more free articles

Stay logged in to skip the surveys

It is clear from the current meltdown that Haiti needs more than another election or a “dialogue” among elected leaders to tinker with malfunctioning institutions. Some followers of the crisis have argued for a concerted effort by the international community to restart a functioning system. Some Haitians believe that the future requires the convening of a council of elected officials and civil and business leaders to stop the continuing deterioration of the rule of law.

What is clear is that something has to change, and the country needs outside help. The question is where to begin. The Trump administration is not in the business of helping poor countries unless there is some sort of reciprocal deal. The current spasm of destructive demonstrations does not seem capable of bringing real change.

Yet it is demonstrably in the interest of the United States and the rest of the Western Hemisphere to help their poorest neighbor get back on its feet. There must be enough expertise and imagination available in Haiti and among international and nongovernmental organizations to formulate a plan and to help form a coalition government, and there must be long-term international assistance to get them going.

The first step is to recognize that Haiti, a nation of 11 million just over 800 miles south of Florida, is in dire straits and getting worse by the day. And to care.

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

Guyana Launches Mass Drug Administration Campaign to Intensify Efforts to End Mosquito-borne Parasitic Disease

Published

on

By

Over the next month, health workers will provide pills to prevent Lymphatic Filariasis in a variety of locations in all endemic areas.

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Friday November
8, 2019 –
At-risk
populations throughout Guyana will be treated for the lymphatic filariasis (LF)
over the next month in a bid to eliminate the mosquito-borne, parasitic disease
as a public health problem.

Under the Mass
Drug Administration (MDA) campaign launched by the Ministry of Public Health, in
collaboration with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), health workers
and volunteers visiting homes, workplaces and schools in eight of the country’s
10 regions to administer the pills.

“Eliminating
lymphatic filariasis is a national, regional and global priority,” said the
Minister of Public Health Volda Lawrence, adding that it will require
commitment from not just the government and partner organizations, but from the
general public as a whole in order to rid populations of this “public health
scourge”.

LF is a
debilitating disease that affects the lymphatic system. While it is not fatal,
it can cause severe swelling in the lower extremities (elephantiasis, or ‘big
foot’ as it is commonly known in the Caribbean) and genitals (hydrocele) that,
once it has manifested, cannot be reversed. Around 60,000 people in Guyana are
already affected by LF, and approximately 500,000 live in endemic areas, at
risk of contracting the disease.

“This MDA
represents the final stage in an initiative that will see a huge reduction in
the cost to society of LF – the cost of drugs, the cost of the stigma. This,
for me, is priceless,” said Dr William Adu-Krow, PAHO/WHO Representative in
Guyana.

A new,
triple drug therapy will be implemented during the MDA. This includes the use
of Ivermectin, along with Diethylcarbamazine and Albendazole- a combination
which has been proven to significantly reduce the burden of filarial infection
while also treating scabies, lice and intestinal worms. 

The
initiative, which is also being supported by the United States Center for
Disease Control with funding from USAID and the End Fund, consists of three
phases: A remapping survey, which ended in July 2019 to show which regions are
endemic; the mass drug administration to provide preventative treatment for
people living in endemic regions; and treatment of those already infected with
LF in order to manage symptoms and reduce morbidity.

The decision
to implement this therapy was taken by Guyana in order to scale-up activities
to eliminate filaria transmission and receive WHO validation by 2025. The
country is also increasing efforts to provide care for those already affected
by the disease.

On October 1, countries of the Americas agreed to a collective approach to the elimination of communicable diseases throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. The Elimination Initiative identifies a wide range of diseases and related conditions, including lymphatic filariasis, as potential candidates for elimination in the Region, and enables countries to consolidate efforts and resources towards ending these diseases and ensuring public health.

Click here to receive news via email from Caribbean360. (View sample)

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Haiti

Haïti – Actualité : Zapping…

Published

on

By


Haïti – Actualité : Zapping…
12/11/2019 11:14:17

Haïti - Actualité : Zapping...

Fusillade à Martissant, des victimes dans une école ?

Dimanche des affrontements armés ont eu lieu entre les gangs rivaux de « Grande Ravine » et de « Ti Bwa » (Martissant) non loin du Lycée Jacques Roumain. Durant la fusillade il y aurait eu plusieurs morts et blessés dans les rangs des deux gangs mais aussi des victimes collatérales dans le lycée Jacques Roumain, où des témoins rapportent plusieurs morts et blessés. Toutefois, pour le moment la Police Nationale d’Haïti ne confirme pas ni ne dément ces faits…

Assassinat de l’agronome Frantz Nelson :

L’agronome Frantz Nelson, ancien cadre du Ministère de l’Agriculture, a été assassiné samedi 9 novembre par des individus armés non-identifiés alors qu’il était sur le point de s’approvisionner en médicaments. Sa famille a découvert son corps à l’hôpital La Paix, à Delmas 33, où il avait été transporté.

Grosse panique à Liancourt :

Lundi, grosse panique dans la commune de Liancourt (commune de Saint-Marc, Artibonite) où des établissements scolaires ont relâché très tôt les élèves. Selon les informations recueillies, des individus armés auraient attaqués certaines écoles…

Propos de Rudy Hériveaux :

« Les errements continus de certains, en total déphasage avec la réalité, loin de nous dégoûter de la politique doivent nous stimuler pour leur rappeler comment accéder au pouvoir. Haïti est en train définitivement de tourner le dos aux pratiques délétères des coups d’État […] À chaque rupture de l’ordre démocratique, Haïti est amputée de ses rêves de progrès, de ses espoirs de renouveau. C’est une chute vertigineuse dans le gouffre insondable de la violence et de la corruption… Nous devons tout mettre en œuvre pour arrêter définitivement ce désastre, » a déclaré Rudy Hériveaux, Porte-parole du PHTK.

Le transport public victime de la crise :

Mardi, Changeux Méhu le Président de l’Association des Propriétaires et Chauffeurs d’Haïti, a lancé un appel aux acteurs de la crise pour qu’il fasse preuve de dépassement et trouve une solution à la crise, rappelant que le secteur du transport public est la principale victime de la paralysie des activités.

Jacmel : Vaste opération de nettoyage :

Après plusieurs semaines de blocage, la Mairie de jacmel a débuté une vaste opération de ramassage de fatras qui entravent la circulation et nuisent à la santé des riverains. La Mairie de Jacmel et la Direction départementale des travaux Publics s’activent à nettoyer les rues de Jacmel et les abords du Marché de Beaudouin où de tas d’immondices jonchent les allées. L’objectif étant d’ouvrir la voie à la reprise des activités dans la ville.

HL/ HaïtiLibre

Source: Source link

Continue Reading

Trending