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Map of wildfires raging throughout northern, southern California

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  • Strong winds paired with a fall heat wave made for a dangerous combination, as devastating wildfires across the state of California are prompting evacuations and destroying a multitude of structures.
  • Bigger fires in northern and southern California continue to burn through thousands of acres of brush, threatening California’s famous wine country and Los Angeles residents alike as responders rush to contain the flames.
  • Here’s a look at the fires, where they are, and what percentage is contained.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Strong winds paired with high temperatures made for a dangerous combination. Wildfires across the state of California are prompting evacuations and destroying a multitude of structures.

A map generated by California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection depicted nine incidents as of Thursday evening, three of which — the Old Water fire, Oak fire, and Palisades fire — are no longer a threat and contained by firefighters on the ground.

Another three fires — Cabrillo, Nelson, and Muir — have at the time of writing burned less than 100 acres and are zero to 20% contained. Bigger fires in northern and southern California continue to burn through thousands of acres of land, threatening California’s famous wine country and Los Angeles residents alike as responders rush to contain the flames.

Here’s a look at the fires, where they are, and what percentage is contained.

california fire map

A map of all the major fires still burning in California.
Cal Fire/Business Insider


Kincade fire

A structure burns during the Kincade fire in Geyserville, California, U.S. October 24, 2019.
Stephen Lam/Reuters


The fire is located in Sonoma county in Northern California. Since it began on October 24, it has burned 16,000 acres and is 5% contained at the time of writing.

Saddle Ridge Fire

Saddle Ridge Fire

FILE PHOTO: Firefighters battle a wind-driven wildfire called the Saddle Ridge fire in the early morning hours Friday in Porter Ranch, California, U.S., October 11, 2019.
Gene Blevins/Reuters


The fire is located in Los Angeles county in Southern California. Since it began on October 10, it has burned 8,799 acres and is 97% contained at the time of writing.

Tick Fire

A still from a video captured by reporter Caleb Lunetta for SignalSCV of the Tick fire raging in Santa Clarita, California.
Screenshot/Caleb Lunetta


The fire is located in Los Angeles county in Southern California. Since it began on October 24, it has burned 3,950 acres and 0% contained at the time of writing.



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Insurtech 2018: Trends & Innovation in Insurance Technology

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Tech-driven disruption in the insurance industry continues at pace, and we’re now entering a new phase — the adaptation of underlying business models.

That’s leading to ongoing changes in the distribution segment of the industry, but more excitingly, we are starting to see movement in the fundamentals of insurance — policy creation, underwriting, and claims management.

Global VC-Backed Insurtech Funding


Business Insider Intelligence


Established insurance companies are investing heavily in insurtech technology to compete with lean startups. Insurtech investments cut operating costs, giving new insurtech companies a chance to compete on pricing.

The Insurtech 2.0 Report from Business Insider Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, will briefly review major changes in the insurtech segment over the past year. It will then examine how startups and legacy players across the insurance value chain are using technology to develop new business models that cut costs or boost revenue, and, in some cases, both. Additionally, we will provide our take on the future of insurance as insurtech continues to proliferate. 

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • Funding is flowing into startups and helping them scale, while legacy players have moved beyond initial experiments and are starting to implement new technology throughout their businesses. 
  • Distribution, the area of the insurance value chain that was first to be disrupted, continues to evolve. 
  • The fundamentals of insurance — policy creation, underwriting, and claims management — are starting to experience true disruption, while innovation in reinsurance has also continued at pace.
  • Insurtechs are using new business models that are enabled by a variety of technologies. In particular, they’re using automation, data analytics, connected devices, and machine learning to build holistic policies for consumers that can be switched on and off on-demand.
  • Legacy insurers, as opposed to brokers, now have the most to lose — but those that move swiftly still have time to ensure they stay in the game.

 In full, the report:

  • Reviews major changes in the insurtech segment over the past year.
  • Examines how startups and legacy players across distribution, insurance, and reinsurance are using technology to develop new business models.
  • Provides our view on what the future of the insurance industry looks like, which Business Insider Intelligence calls Insurtech 2.0.

The companies included in this report are: Zhong An, Lemonade, Clover Health, Bright Health, Bought By Many, Worry+Peace, Brolly, Aviva, Neos, Simplesurance, Trov, getsafe, Slice Labs, Wrisk, Next Insurance, Drover, bestow, Tractable, Oxbow Partners, Ageas, IBM, Majesco, Guidewire, Cuvva, Dinghy, Oscar Health.

Interested in getting the full report? Here’s how to get access:

  1. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >>  Purchase & Download Now
  2. Sign up for Fintech Pro, Business Insider Intelligence’s expert product suite tailored for today’s (and tomorrow’s) decision-makers in the financial services industry, delivered to your inbox 6x a week. >> Get Started
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  4. Current subscribers can read the report here.



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David Anderson, Francine Graham: Jersey City shooters identified

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The gunmen in Tuesday’s deadly Jersey City shooting at the Jersey City Kosher Supermarket have been identified. One of them appears to have a connection to the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, which has been described as an anti-Semitic hate group, law enforcement officials told news outlets.

The shooters have been identified as 47-year-old David Anderson and 50-year-old Francine Graham. 

The New York Times and NBC New York report that Anderson appeared to have a connection to, or was a one-time follower, of the Black Hebrew Israelite movement. WABC reports that both Anderson and Graham were members.

jersey city shooting 4

The scene outside the grocery store.
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP


Black Hebrew Israelites believe they are the true descendants of the ancient Israelites and believe any other groups identifying as Jews are impostors, an idea rejected by mainstream Judaism.

There are several different Black Hebrew Israelite sects, not all of which hold the same beliefs. Some of them according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, are associated with anti-Semitic and anti-white Black Nationalist hate groups.

“Although most Hebrew Israelites are neither explicitly racist nor anti-Semitic and do not advocate violence, there is a rising extremist sector within the Hebrew Israelite movement whose adherents believe that Jews are devilish impostors and who openly condemn whites as evil personified, deserving only death or slavery,” the SPLC details on its website.

Officials familiar with the case told The New York Times that a brief manifesto was found in the shooters’ van but provided no clear rationale behind the shooting.

Anderson had previously faced at least three different criminal weapons charges and had spent time in jail, according to NBC New York.

It is unclear if Graham has any ties to the Black Hebrew Israelite movement. Her brother, Frederick Graham, told the New York Times that he was not aware of any links she had to it.

jersey city kosher

Emergency responders work at a kosher supermarket, the site of a shooting in Jersey City, N.J., Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop said authorities believe gunmen targeted the market during a shooting that killed multiple people Tuesday.
Seth Wenig/AP


However, a former neighbor told NBC New York that Graham became a “dark person” after she met Anderson, who coerced her into a militant religion. The neighbor could not identify what that religion was.

The two were also prime suspects in a homicide over the weekend in nearby Bayonne, New Jersey, according to News12 New Jersey.

Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop said the kosher supermarket was “clearly targeted” in the attack, which left six people dead, including the assailants and a police officer.

“Hate and anti-Semitism have never had a place here in [Jersey City] and will never have a place in our city,” he said on Twitter.

The three victims were identified as Mindel Ferencz, 33, who co-managed the grocery store with her husband, Moshe Deutch, a 24-year-old rabbinical student, and Douglas Miguel Rodriguez, 49, who worked at the store.

The shooting is being investigated by police as a case of domestic terrorism, according to NBC New York.



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How to get a bank loan: Get a personal loan from your bank

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Personal Finance Insider writes about products, strategies, and tips to help you make smart decisions with your money. We may receive a small commission from our partners, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective.

how to get a bank loan

To get a bank loan, make sure you have a plan to pay it back.
Bloom Productions / Getty Images


  • If you want to apply for a bank loan, the first thing you’ll need to do is check your credit.
  • Then, you’ll need to find out whether your bank offers personal loans. Generally, to get a bank loan you’ll need to be an existing customer with good credit.
  • If your bank does offer loans, you’ll need to assemble your paperwork, get clear on the terms of the loan, and make sure you have a plan to pay it back.
  • If your bank doesn’t offer loans — or even if it does — you may want to get quotes for comparison from online lenders, which have fewer regulations and can base their offers less on your existing credit and more on your ability to repay.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Whether it’s a personal loan to purchase a car, consolidate debt, finance a business or make home improvements, applying for a personal loan from a bank can be a way to build your credit and pay for what you need.

To get a personal loan from a bank, you’ll generally need to be an existing customer with good credit, says Jamie Young, personal finance expert at Credible, an online loan marketplace. 

“If you bank with Chase, Bank of America, or Capital One, you’ll have to look elsewhere — they don’t offer personal loans,” says Young. “Goldman Sachs Bank offers an online application process through its Marcus brand, and it’s also easy to request rates from SunTrust Bank’s online lending division, LightStream.”

Note that banks face more regulations than online lenders, so “as a result, they have the strictest lending standards,” says Priyanka Prakash, lending and credit expert at Fundera. “Online lenders are a lot more flexible. They place less importance on credit and more importance on your ability to pay back a loan. That means income is paramount.”

Interested in seeing what an online lender could offer? Consider these options from our partners:

Or, you can use a personal loan marketplace like Credible to request rates from multiple lenders at a time.

How to get a bank loan

1. Check your credit score

If you’re beginning the loan process for the first time, start by getting your credit score.

You can check it for free at any time at sites like Credit Karma, Credit Sesame, and Credit.com. You don’t need a perfect credit score of 850 to get a loan, but lenders see your credit score as an indication of your trustworthiness as a buyer and adjust their offers accordingly — so the higher your score, the better.

2. If something looks amiss, pull your credit report

Your credit score is three-digit shorthand for the information contained in your credit report, which monitors all of your credit-related activity. According to the Federal Trade Commission, you’re entitled to one free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies: Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.

Note that there are plenty of opportunities to pay for your credit report, but annualcreditreport.com is the best place to get your report for free (or call 1-877-322-8228). Be prepared to provide your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth to verify your identity.

2. Know that loans can actually boost credit scores

If you are looking to take out a loan to consolidate credit card debt, or pay debt down faster, it can help in more ways than you may realize.

“Taking out a personal loan to pay down high-interest credit card debt can boost your credit score by lowering your credit utilization ratio,” says Young. “That’s how close you are to hitting your limits on your credit cards. Try not to use more than 30% of your limit on any card.”   

In addition, If you haven’t taken out an installment loan like a car loan before, adding a personal loan to your credit mix can boost your credit score. “That’s because your credit mix makes up 10% of your credit score,” she says.

3. Understand that there are types of personal loans

There are two types of personal loans: secured and unsecured.

Unsecured are loans which aren’t supported by collateral, like personal assets or a house. A bank evaluates whether to grant you the loan based on your financial history and credit score.

If you don’t qualify for an unsecured loan, lenders also offer secured options, which may be leveraged against assets or accounts you have at the bank, or something more tangible, like a house or car. Mortgages, home equity loans, and auto loans are considered secured loans, since you’re putting up collateral.

Remember that if you take out a secured loan using your home, your car, or something else as collateral, you run the risk of losing whatever you’ve leveraged should you become unable to pay your loans.

Most any lender that offers unsecured loans, including banks and credit unions, will also offer secured loans.

4. Make sure your bank offers personal loans

As Jamie Young from Credible said above, to get a personal loan from a bank, you’ll generally need to be an existing customer with good credit. Some banks don’t offer personal loans, so you’ll want to find out what your bank does offer.

If your bank doesn’t offer loans — or even if it does — you may want to get quotes from online lenders, which have fewer regulations and can base their offers less on your existing credit and more on your ability to repay. Online lenders can be an alternative to bank loans, or a basis for comparison.

After you’ve checked rates offered by online lenders, see if your bank will offer you a better deal.

5. Get your paperwork in order

One of the most challenging parts about getting a bank loan is the amount of documentation that’s required as part of the process.

“Getting a bank loan can take weeks, even months. The main reason it takes so long is that you have to submit a bunch of paperwork,” says Prakash from Fundera.  

The nature of the paperwork will vary based on the type of loan you’re applying for, but in general, you can expect to need:

  • pay stubs/proof of income
  • the last couple years of tax returns
  • documentation of 401(k)s and other financial accounts
  • photo ID
  • rent/mortgage history
  • proof of collateral, if you’re pursuing a secured loan

It’s a good idea to get these basics in order before applying for the loan, in order to speed up the process.

6. Try and get preapproved

Although it’s not a solid guarantee, preapproval is when a lender extends an unofficial offer on a loan, pending full approval.

In this instance, preapproval will tell the borrower what loan amount, terms, and repayment schedule they will likely qualify for in advance. Also, a preapproval acknowledges that the borrower has met the bank’s general eligibility requirements.

The process usually includes an application and a credit history evaluation, and while it’s a worthwhile step to take, it’s not a guarantee that the bank will extend those exact terms when it comes time to issue a loan.

7. Know the terms

Personal loans are installment loans, which is when you borrow a fixed amount of money and pay it back with interest in monthly installments over the life of the loan.

The terms of the loan are in months and can range from 12 to 96 months. When you complete the loan terms, that loan is considered closed. If more money is needed, you must reapply for a new loan.

8. Make a plan to pay it back

Once you get your loan, make sure you have a plan to pay it back. How much will you owe per month? Do you plan to pay the minimum required, or to make extra payments and pay it back more quickly? When is the payment due?

Consider setting up automatic payments from your checking account once your paycheck clears, or calendar reminders to make sure you never miss a due date.

“Your payment history makes up 35% of your credit score,” says Young from Credible. “If you continue to make on-time payments and reduce your total amount of debt, your credit will improve” — and the next time you want to borrow money, it will be easier.

Considering an online lender instead of a bank? Take a look at these offers from our partners:



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