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Kopari Coconut Toothpaste review: Sulfate-free toothpaste with coconut

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  • We’re taught to think that the bubbles in our personal-care products like shampoo and toothpaste are what’s keeping our mouths and hair clean.
  • But that’s actually a result of sulfates, which are lathering agents that can irritate skin and hair, and lead to potential breakouts.
  • I have acne-prone skin and would often get breakouts around my mouth, but once I started using a sulfate-free toothpaste from Kopari ($12), the breakouts decreased. 

Growing up, we were taught that the suds in our personal-care products like shampoo, toothpaste, body wash, and more were a sign that we were getting clean.

There are tons of white bubbles in advertisements for these products, but sulfates can have a hidden side to them — all that cleansing can strip your hair and skin of oils, and even cause your skin to break out.

NYC dermatologist Dr. Joshua Zeichner tells Well + Good that sulfates are “a known irritant, causing skin inflammation. It used to be used commonly in cleansers and toothpaste because it acts as a surfactant to help remove dirt from the skin and gunk from teeth.”

Meaning that when toothpaste foam inevitably gets onto your face, it could cause irritation and lead to pimples. It might not happen to everyone, but I have combination skin that is prone to acne and would often have painful cystic pimples around my mouth and chin. They were large, hard to pop, and even more difficult to get rid of. 

But since switching to a sulfate-free toothpaste, I don’t get those breakouts anymore.

I often have cystic acne around my mouth, but since using this sulfate-free toothpaste, I haven’t had any new spots

After reading about the effects of sulfates, I decided to try a sulfate-free toothpaste for myself. I went to Urban Outfitters’ beauty section because it often has brands that provide natural alternatives to traditional drugstore products, and found Kopari Beauty’s Coconut Toothpaste ($12).

It’s vegan, gluten-free, fluoride-free, sulfate-free, and cruelty-free. The removal of fluoride is a little gray though — according to the American Dental Association, fluoride is safe and effective at helping to remove plaque and strengthen enamel, so consult with your dentist before trying this one.

While it leaves out certain ingredients, it does include ones that I’d never heard of but was excited to try. Like hydroxyapatite, which is a naturally occurring mineral in teeth and bones, and helps to strengthen enamel. And coconut oil, which is antimicrobial, soothes gum inflammation, and won’t hurt enamel. And peppermint oil, which provides a minty scent for fresh breath. 

$12 for a tube of toothpaste is a serious investment but I’d pay it because it helps prevent painful acne around my mouth that takes days or weeks to heal

The Kopari Coconut Toothpaste tastes and smells like sweet mint, but not in a way that feels artificial.

It’s thinner than the traditional toothpastes I’ve tried; the consistency feels more water-y and thin. And I’ll admit that on the first brush or two, it was difficult for me to see or feel that it was working because I was so used to the toothpaste bubble up.

When I brush my teeth with the Kopari, my breath is fresh, my teeth squeak when I touch them, and I’ve even seen some increased whiteness over time. My sensitive gums also don’t react negatively when I brush with this toothpaste.  

It’s $12 for 3.4 ounces, or around $4 an ounce, so it’s definitely a hefty price for toothpaste — drugstore tubes cost around just $3. But now that I’ve tried Kopari Coconut Toothpaste out for a while, that $12 doesn’t look so bad — I’ve had it for months and am not even halfway through it. I have a history of painful breakouts around my mouth, and $12 toothpaste definitely beats trying an expensive serum or treatment that’d cost way more.

Buy Kopari Coconut Toothpaste for $12 at Ulta | Amazon | Urban Outfitters



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10 things in tech you need to know today, May 26

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Bill Gates



AP/zz/PBG/AAD/STAR MAX/IPx


Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Tuesday.

  1. The UK will review the role of China’s Huawei in its 5G networks. Huawei had been given a limited role in providing equipment for the superfast mobile network, but that could now change.
  2. Australia’s Covidsafe app has faded into insignificance just one month after launch. The contact tracing app reportedly only helped identify one person with Covid-19 and has diminished in importance as the country’s economy re-opens, according to The Guardian. 
  3. More than 40% of Republicans in a new poll say they think Bill Gates wants to use COVID-19 vaccines to implant location-tracking microchips in recipients. Gates, who has donated $300 million to coronavirus vaccine efforts, has become the target of online conspiracy theorists and conservative pundits over his coronavirus vaccination efforts.
  4. Elon Musk’s Boring Company has finished the tunneling for its Tesla-powered people mover in Las Vegas. The Boring Company completed the second of two tunnels underneath Las Vegas’ convention center. 
  5. Chinese tech company Qihoo 360 slammed the US government for ‘politicizing business’ after it imposed export sanctions on 33 more Chinese companies and government institutions. Anti-virus software company Qihoo 360 said it opposed the action.
  6. Doctors in UK hospitals are using headsets from Microsoft to reduce the amount of staff coming into contact with COVID-19 patients. The HoloLens headsets allow doctors to share their point of view with colleagues remotely, while also showing holographic projections to the doctor wearing the headset.
  7. A robot barista that takes orders, makes coffee, and delivers drinks to customers is being used in South Korea to help with social distancing. The new robot can take orders, make 60 different types of coffee, and serve drinks to customers at their seats.
  8. Drones will help to supply protective equipment to a hospital on a remote Scottish island. The 10-mile journey between mainland Oban and the Isle of Mull usually involves a road trip and a 45-minute ferry, should take only 15 minutes.
  9. A 5G mast in Derbyshire, England was set on fire just days after it was erected. Attacks on 5G masts have been fuelled by a conspiracy theory wrongly linking 5G and coronavirus.
  10. A Canadian e-commerce startup raised $2 million entirely over Zoom to offer try-before-you-buy fashion during coronavirus. The try-before-you-buy fashion startup has fast-tracked its launch process with Covid-19 closing physical clothes stores across North America.

Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for “Business Insider” in your Alexa’s flash briefing settings.

You can also subscribe to this newsletter here — just tick “10 Things in Tech You Need to Know.”



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Trump limits travel from Brazil to US for noncitizens due to COVID-19

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  • The White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said in a statement on Sunday that the US would temporarily restrict travel from Brazil, where COVID-19 cases are spiking.
  • The order applies to foreigners who were in the country within 14 days of trying to enter the US. It does not apply to US citizens, legal permanent residents, or their family members.
  • The order was set to go into effect on Thursday, May 28, but the White House revised that date to Tuesday, May 26.
  • The US has already restricted travel from China, Europe, and Iran, and it has extended the order to Brazil as the country now trails only the US in its number of confirmed coronavirus cases.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has ordered the US to temporarily restrict travel from Brazil, where COVID-19 cases are spiking, the White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said in a statement on Sunday.

The order suspends entry into the US for foreign nationals who “were physically present within the Federative Republic of Brazil during the 14-day period preceding their entry or attempted entry into the United States.”

It does not apply to US citizens, legal permanent residents, or their family members. The order also excludes “the free flow of commerce” between the US and Brazil.

The order was set to go into effect on Thursday, May 28 at 11:59 p.m., but the White House revised that date to Tuesday, May 26, at 11:59 p.m. It was not immediately clear why the date has been changed.

In a Sunday statement, McEnany said the move by Trump would be enacted to “protect our country” as the number of coronavirus cases in Brazil continues to spike.

Brazil, which has more than 347,000 confirmed cases, surpassed Russia in recent days and now trails only the US in its total number of infections, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The Trump administration previously restricted travel from China in late January and Iran in February. In March, weeks after the virus had already taken hold in Europe, the restrictions were extended to the Schengen Area — which includes 26 European countries — as well as the UK and Ireland.

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Joe Biden makes first appearance outside in months for Memorial Day

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  • Former Vice President Joe Biden honored veterans on Memorial Day in an event which saw him appear outside his home for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic shut down the US in March. 
  • Biden and his wife, Jill, both wore black face masks as they laid down a white wreath on a memorial in a park near their home in Delaware. 
  • President Donald Trump has continued his refusal to wear a face mask during the virus outbreak, and has continued to sling insults at Biden, whose presidential campaign has been largely placed on pause due to COVID-19.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden made a public appearance outside of his home for the first time in over two months on Monday to observe Memorial Day at a veterans park in Delaware. 

Biden and his wife, Jill, both wore black face masks in their first outdoor appearances during the coronavirus pandemic. The former vice president has remained inside his Delaware home in the weeks since the virus forced his campaign to cancel a rally on March 10 in Cleveland, according to the Associated Press. 

Biden’s visit to the Delaware Memorial Bridge Veterans Memorial Park had been unannounced, according to The New York Times. He and his wife laid a white wreath at the memorial. 

Biden, 77, is part of the group of elderly people whom the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say are at a higher risk for serious symptoms if COVID-19 is contracted. 

joe biden memorial day appearance

Joe Biden wears a face mask to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus as he and Jill Biden depart after placing a wreath at the Delaware Memorial Bridge Veterans Memorial Park on May 25, 2020, in New Castle, Del.

Patrick Semansky/AP


President Donald Trump, 73, has refused to wear a face mask during the virus outbreak, and has continued to sling insults at Biden, whose presidential campaign has been largely placed on pause due to COVID-19. On Monday, Trump gave a Memorial Day address without a mask at Fort McHenry in Baltimore. 

The death toll from the novel coronavirus in the US neared 100,000 on Monday, after Trump spent time golfing over the weekend. 

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