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Bills defender accuses NFL of double-standard after hit on Josh Allen

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  • Buffalo Bills safeties Micah Hyde and Jordan Poyer called out the officials in Sunday’s game against the New England Patriots after quarterback Josh Allen took a big hit.
  • Hyde and Poyer agreed that if a similar hit was thrown at Tom Brady, the result would have likely been a penalty and an ejection from the game.
  • In an interview with WEEI, Brady said that such hits are a part of the risk that comes with being a mobile quarterback, and recalled a similar shot he took when playing against the Bills 18 years ago.
  • Patriots head coach Bill Belichick also said that the team was playing by the book and that Allen was a tough guy to take down.
  • The teams will play a closely watched rematch in Week 16 in Foxboro.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Buffalo Bills were not at all happy after watching quarterback Josh Allen take a brutal hit in their 16-10 loss to the New England Patriots on Sunday.

The hit in question came in the fourth quarter as the Bills attempted to mount a comeback against their divisional rival. After Allen scrambled for a seven-yard gain, he was first met by Patriots safety Duron Harmon, who teed Allen up for a devastating hit to be delivered by cornerback Jonathan Jones.

The Bills secondary didn’t shy away from criticizing the officials no-call on the hit.

After the game, Bills safety Micah Hyde called out the officials for what he perceived as a double-standard in how hits are called against his quarterback and his opposition, Tom Brady.

“That’s the first thing that came out of my mouth on the sideline: If one of us did that to 12, we wouldn’t have been in the game anymore,” Hyde said after the game. “There’s no way. There’s no way we would’ve continued to play in that game.”

 

Jordan Poyer, Hyde’s partner in the Bills secondary, agreed.

“I’d think you’d be probably thrown out of the football game. I’m just going to leave it at that,” said Poyer, per Rochester’s Democrat and Chronicle. “It is what it is. The ref saw a bang-bang play. It’s hard to say because I didn’t really see it, but like you said, if that type of hit happens on No. 12 you’d probably be thrown out of the game.”

The Patriots, however, pushed back, saying hits like the one Allen took are a risk that comes with being a mobile quarterback.

Brady softly pushed back at the criticism in an interview with WEEI’s “The Greg Hill Show” on Monday, saying that big hits are one of the risks that come with rushing in the open field as a quarterback.

Read more: ‘Just let us play!’: Tom Brady criticizes NFL officiating during game he wasn’t playing in

“A lot of quarterbacks who do run, they’re trying to make yards and it’s great. At the same time, you’re susceptible to big hits,” Brady said, per ESPN. “Whether it’s flagged or not, or whether it’s a penalty, a lot of the rules have changed over the years, but from a quarterback’s standpoint I feel like it’s always best to try to be available to the team, and it’s trying to take risk/reward and so forth. Nobody likes to see anybody get hurt out there. From my own experience, I try to do the best I can to avoid any big shots like that.”

Brady does have his share of experience taking big hits in his two decades as a starting NFL quarterback, with one notable hit coming 18 years ago against the Bills.

Brady told WEEI that after that game, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick pulled him aside to remind him to stay safe even if it meant giving up a few extra yards.

“I remember the next day, Coach Belichick said to me — I’ll never forget this — he said, ‘Hey Brady, if you want to have a career in this league, when you’re running like that, you either throw the ball away or slide!’ I’ve kind of taken to that.”

While he doesn’t want his 42-year-old quarterback taking such damage, Belichick also defended the Patriots big hit against Allen.

“Allen is a big runner, he’s a strong guy, he’s hard to tackle. He certainly broke several tackles against us,” Belichick said Monday, according to ESPN. “Jon turned when he hit him, he didn’t lead with his head, he didn’t have that posture. I think [senior V.P. of officiating] Al Riveron talked about the play yesterday, and that’s what we have to go by. “

Both sides have a point in their respective arguments. The Patriots aren’t in control of how the officials call the game, and can only go by what the NFL tells them is and is not a legal hit. At the same time, given how protective officials have been of Brady in the past, it’s almost impossible to imagine that a player wouldn’t be ejected for throwing such a hit at the Patriots quarterback.

The Bills and Patriots will meet again in Week 16 in Foxboro, in a game you can be sure that both teams will be watching the officiating closely.

Read more:

Former Patriots centers say Tom Brady shoves towels and powder down their pants to avoid getting wet footballs from ‘the swamp ass’

The Browns nearly pulled off the play of the NFL season with a triple-reverse and a 60-yard pass from Odell Beckham Jr.

How Gardner Minshew, the Jaguars’ mustachioed, sixth-round rookie quarterback, became a breakout star and the NFL’s most interesting man

LeBron James hosted California Gov. Gavin Newsom as he signed into law a bill allowing college athletes to be paid



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Billionaires’ success boils down to 3 simple traits, a new report says

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  • Billionaires have a trifecta of traits to thank for their success, a new report by UBS and PwC found.
  • Their smart risk-taking, focus, and determination is what makes them successful.
  • Companies run by billionaires perform almost twice as well as the rest of the market, Business Insider previously reported.
  • One of UBS’ billionaire clients plans in decades instead of quarters, according to John Matthews, the investment bank’s Group Managing Director of UBS’ Head of Ultra High Net Worth Americas.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Intelligence isn’t what makes billionaires successful, a new report by investment bank UBS and PricewaterhouseCoopers found.

It’s billionaires’ “appetite for smart risk-taking, business focus, and determination” that helps them build and sustain their wealth, according to UBS and PwC’s 2019 Billionaires Report. These personality traits create what UBS and PwC call the “billionaire effect”: Companies run by billionaires perform twice as well as the rest of the market.

According to UBS and PwC, companies run by billionaires enjoyed returns of 17.8% between 2003 and the end of 2018. That’s compared to the MSCI AC World Index’s 9.1% return during the same time period. Billionaires’ companies were also consistently more profitable and performed better in the six years following an IPO than non-billionaire controlled companies, according to the study.

Billionaires have a trifecta of traits that add up to their success, the report outlines: They know how to take smart risks; they are obsessively focused on their businesses, which allows them to see opportunities others missed; and think longer-term than less wealthy CEOs.

“[I had a] conversation with a client talking about their success and how he has become successful with his company and his comment to me was, ‘John, I don’t think in quarters, I think in 10 years,'” John Matthews, the Group Managing Director of UBS’ Head of Ultra High Net Worth Americas, said at a press event hosted by UBS on October 6. “It’s a different mindset.”

A multitude of studies and books have similarly concluded that billionaires think differently than the majority of the population

The UBS and PwC report underscores findings that align with what other studies and books have also found: Billionaires think and operate differently than the majority of the population.

A review of the personality tests of 43 people with net worths above $11 million by German researcher Rainer Zitelmann found that ultra-wealthy entrepreneurs tend to have high tolerances for frustration and be more detail-oriented than the general population, Business Insider previously reported.

“To sum this up, you can say that rich people are less neurotic and less agreeable, but have a higher degree of conscientiousness, are more open to new experience, and more extroverted than the population as a whole,” Zitelmann said.

Entrepreneur Rafael Badziag, meanwhile, spent five years conducting face-to-face interviews with 21 self-made billionaires and found that the same characteristics that make them successful can also lead to their downfalls.

“Billionaires are nonconformists who demonstrate individualism at an early age when they break more than a few rules,” Badziag wrote in his book, “The Billion Dollar Secret: 20 Principles of Billionaire Wealth and Success.”

“Knowing when to make the leap versus when to run in the opposite direction often means the difference between bankruptcy and billions,” Badziag added.



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Instagram is testing removing ‘likes’ from posts worldwide

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Instagram has been experimenting with removing “likes” from posts, and now, it’s expanding that test worldwide, Josh Constine at TechCrunch first reported.

The company has been removing likes from some accounts in Australia, Canada, Brazil, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and New Zealand since July. Then, last Friday, Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri announced that the experiment would expand to this US beginning this week. An Instagram spokesperson confirmed to Business Insider that Thursday begins a worldwide rollout.

But not every user will lose likes, only those who are included in the test. And if you are part of the test, the change may not be permanent.

“While the feedback from early testing has been positive, this is a fundamental change to Instagram, and so we’re continuing our test to learn more from our global community,” the spokesperson said.

Instagram appears to be mulling the change after critics have come after the app for its effect on users’ mental health, and Mosseri said as much on stage at Wired25 last week.

“We will make decisions that hurt the business if they help people’s well-being and health,” Mosseri said on stage at the event, Wired’s Adrienne So first reported.

Some influencers and celebrities have complained that this change will hurt them, while others say it won’t affect their businesses. Instagram says it is working on ways to help creators while it experiments with removing likes.



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Apple fires man accused of sending self intimate photo while fixing iPhone

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  • Apple fired a employee at a California store over accusations he sent himself an “extremely personal” photo from a customer’s phone.
  • Gloria Fuentes took her phone to the Apple store in Valley Plaza, Bakersfield, to get it fixed on November 5. After a lengthy check, she said she was told it was beyond repair.
  • When Fuentes got home, she said she saw a photo she “took for my boyfriend” had been sent to an unknown number. She confronted the Apple staffer later that day.
  • Apple said: “The employee acted far outside the strict privacy guidelines to which we hold all Apple employees. He is no longer associated with our company.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. 

Apple fired a employee from a store in California after a customer accused him of sending himself an “extremely personal” photo from her iPhone while he tried to repair it.

Gloria Fuentes wrote on Facebook on November 5 that she went to the Apple store in Valley Plaza, Bakersfield, the previous day to get her screen fixed.

Fuentes said the employee took her phone away and asked for her password several times. He later told her he couldn’t fix it, and that she needed to go through her network provider.

When Fuentes checked her messages after she got home, she said she noticed a photo had been sent to an unknown number.

“I open it and instantly wanted to cry!!! This guy went through my gallery and sent himself one of my EXTREMELY PERSONAL pictures that I took for my boyfriend,” she wrote

“THIS PICTURE WAS FROM ALMOST A YEAR AGO SO HE HAD TO HAVE SCROLLED UP FOR A WHILE TO GET TO THAT PICTURE being that I have over 5,000 pics in my phone!”

Apple Store

Apple staffers stand in an Apple store.
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“I could not express how disgusted I felt and how long I cried after I saw this!!,” she said.

Fuentes went back to the store to confront the employee later that day, who she says admitted it was “his number” but claimed he “doesn’t know how that pic got sent.”

In a statement to The Washington Post, the company said it had fired the man in question.

“Apple immediately launched an internal investigation and determined that the employee acted far outside the strict privacy guidelines to which we hold all Apple employees,” it said.

“He is no longer associated with our company.”

Fuentes said she would be “pressing legal charges against him.” Fuentes did not respond to a message from Business Insider asking for more information.



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