Connect with us

Entertainment

Bake Off’s Nadiya Hussain reveals childhood sexual assault

Published

on


Nadiya Hussain

TV personality Nadiya Hussain has revealed she was sexually assaulted at the age of five by a relative in Bangladesh.

The 2015 Great British Bake Off winner said the trauma “played a role” in subsequent post traumatic stress disorder and panic attacks.

In an interview with the Mail on Sunday, she also said she considered killing herself when she was 10.

Hussain has previously spoken of her lifelong struggle with anxiety.

She told the paper she has “no doubt” the assault influenced her mental health, calling it a memory that has “stayed with [her] forever”.

Her forthcoming book, Finding My Voice, is the first time she has written about the assault, having only told her sisters recently, and a friend at school.

“It turned out a very similar thing had happened to her… [and] I think it’s important to talk about it because it probably happens much more than we care to talk about,” she said.

  • Nadiya praised for showing anxiety battle
  • Nadiya Hussain on her panic ‘monster’

She told the paper she only understood what had happened to her years later during a biology lesson explaining sex, prompting her to vomit in the laboratory bench sink.

“If that happened to my children, I don’t even want to say what I would do. I can’t even… just as a mother… I can’t. I have no words. I very rarely have no words,” she added.

Hussain, who grew up in a Bangladeshi community in Luton, also discusses being a victim of bullying at school in her memoir.

She writes how a boy in her class exposed himself to her, before calling her a “black bitch” and repeatedly slamming her hand in a door.

In another incident boys forced her head into a toilet – a memory that has left her with persistent flashbacks.

She writes about how she tried to kill herself at the age of 10.

“I didn’t know what death was. All I knew was that it meant not living the life I had now – and I didn’t like my life,” she writes.

But she changed her mind after her parents announced her mother was pregnant with her brother, Shak.

“I can’t go anywhere, I have to stay for him. He will need me,” she writes.

Earlier this year, Hussain opened up about the bullying in BBC One documentary Nadiya: Anxiety and Me.

“I still have that memory of the water going up my nose and feeling like if they don’t pull me up now I am going to drown with my head in this toilet,” she said.

Viewers praised her for allowing cameras to follow her as she sought diagnosis and treatment for “extreme anxiety”.

She spoke about her constant struggle with a panic disorder, which she described as a “monster”, in 2017, two years after she won the Great British Bake Off.


Information and advice

If you or someone you know is struggling with issues raised by this story, find support through BBC Action Line.



Source link

Entertainment

The art of hunting down stolen treasures

Published

on

By


Gold toilet by Maurizio CattelanImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The fully functioning solid gold toilet – worth nearly £5m – was installed at Blenheim Palace as part of an art exhibition

Only a day after it was plumbed into one of Blenheim Palace’s grand rooms, a solid gold toilet created by artist Maurizio Cattelan was ripped out and stolen.

More than two months later, police are seemingly no closer to bringing charges over the raid, described as being like something from a “heist movie”.

Renowned art detective Charley Hill explains the complexities of solving such crimes.

Image caption

Charley Hill led an art and antiques recovery unit as a Scotland Yard detective

Mr Hill knows what he’s talking about, having helped solve one of the most high-profile art crimes of the 20th Century – the 1994 theft from an Oslo museum of an 1893 version of Edvard Munch’s The Scream.

The Norwegian authorities called in Mr Hill’s then employers, the Metropolitan Police, for help in finding the painting, which was taken with embarrassing ease. Posing as a “slightly dodgy, mid Atlantic-accented art dealer”, the undercover detective sergeant managed to make contact with the criminals responsible.

Beforehand, Mr Hill had done his homework. “In that particular version, the original version, he [Munch] blew a candle out on it. I made a particular point of memorising exactly how those candle wax drops looked.”

Having persuaded the thieves he was willing to buy the painting, they took him to a summerhouse where the artwork was stored in a basement. “I knew the picture was right straight away because I checked the wax.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

“A masterpiece will tell you itself that it’s a masterpiece – it just jumps out at you”

Before his involvement in the recovery of The Scream in May 1994, Mr Hill’s most successful case was leading the 1993 investigation that found paintings by Vermeer and Goya, which had been stolen seven years earlier from Russborough House in County Wicklow.

His “eye” for such cases led to him heading up his own art theft squad at the Met. “I look at things and I can see whether they are real, unreal, or old or new. I can do things like that,” he says.

He left the police in 1997, but his global reputation means he is never short of clients. Mr Hill is usually contacted by victims and he then decides whether he wants to take on the case.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

On 12 February 1994, it took thieves less than a minute to climb a ladder, smash through a window of the Nasjonalmuseet in Oslo and cut The Scream from a wall

His days of creating fake identities are over and he doesn’t conduct undercover operations any more. Now Mr Hill’s central tactic is a simple one – “talking to people”.

“It’s the only way, effectively; you’ll find out what’s going on, who’s done what and in my case where things are.” He says he doesn’t “deal in ransoms” or “engage in ‘art-napping'” but relies on his “very useful” reputation to recover stolen treasures.

“When I talk to people, like the convicted criminal I spoke to a couple of nights ago… she knows about me and is interested in meeting me and talking to me,” the 72-year-old says.

Speaking to those “who have access” but are “generally quite far down the line from the actual thieves” is one important tactic. Mr Hill says those who supply information to complete the jigsaw can include informants, experts and in some cases, convicted criminals.

Image caption

The former police officer says he will continue trying to recover lost art for as long as he can

Mr Hill loves art, a passion that started as a child in the US, where, because of his American father, he spent his school years. While he accepts there’s a “romantic view of art theft”, he actually finds it a “depressing” crime.

“I believe these are works of creation by human beings, that these inanimate objects have lives of their own… they are worth preserving, protecting and keeping for us and future generations.”

You might also be interested in:

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Mr Hill is still trying to retrieve artworks taken in a 1990 raid on the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston

Since going freelance, the Vietnam veteran says his perspective has changed somewhat.

“I have got no interest at all in arresting people, however with this kind of crime you want to get these things back, and sticking somebody up in front of a court is pointless – it doesn’t actually recover these things.

“I do a lot of research but my main tool in my kitbag is my capacity to talk to people and go back later and talk to them again.”

In the course of getting the information he needs, Mr Hill says he sometimes turns a blind eye when “people tell me about things I can do nothing about”.

He admits some see his work as meddling – or even something that’s “outrageous and shouldn’t be done”.

“I never break the law, but I do [annoy] the police,” he adds. “I wouldn’t say I’m a rogue because I am not dishonest. I’m not doing it for some ideological or commercial gain.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The toilet was stolen on 14 September from Blenheim Palace, near Woodstock – the stately home is the principal residence of the Duke of Marlborough

So what does he think has happened to the gold toilet?

A month before it was stolen, Edward Spencer-Churchill – half-brother of the Duke of Marlborough – said the artwork was “not going to be the easiest thing to nick”. The thieves thought differently.

Mr Hill, who lives in Richmond in south-west London, doesn’t believe the toilet was taken to order for a rich client – “the stuff in movies is by and large rubbish” – and is doubtful whether the piece even exists any more.

Because as a work of art it will have been “meaningless” to the thieves, his view is a mob of low-level criminals will have destroyed it. “All they know is that it’s made of gold and they have a few bob coming if they cut it up, melt it down and flog the gold,” he says.

Image copyright
Blenheim Palace

Image caption

Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan has said he hopes the toilet theft was a “kind of Robin Hood-inspired action”

It’s safe to say the owner of the toilet is unlikely to call in Mr Hill to crack this crime, but he isn’t short of work.

He says he’s close to solving the theft of 13 artworks from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston in 1990 – a case he’s been working on for more than 25 years.

The museum is offering a reward of $10m (£7.75m) for information leading directly to the recovery of all 13 works in good condition, but for Mr Hill – who says these days he only asks for his clients to cover his expenses – it isn’t about the money.

“I love art and I know the important thing is to get the stuff back,” he says. “Someone has got to do it; who else is going to get these things back if I don’t try?”



Source link

Continue Reading

Entertainment

I’m A Celebrity: ITV ends ‘bushtucker trials’ that include eating live bugs

Published

on

By


Im a Celebrity CampmatesImage copyright
ITV

Live insects will not be eaten in this year’s I’m A Celebrity, in a “permanent” change to the reality TV show.

I’m A Celebrity has previously been criticised for using live bugs in its ‘bushtucker trials’.

Some tasks on the ITV show have included insects being eaten alive or dumped onto contestants.

The stars could still be covered in bugs during filming in Australia but any eaten will already be dead.

“Producers have taken a look at the trials and decided that no live critters would be eaten in the trials this year,” BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat has been told.

An ITV source said: “They have been planning this for some time and actually last year beach worms were the only critters eaten live but this time around they’ve decided to implement the change fully and permanently.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Insects like this witchetty grub have been eaten alive on previous series of I’m A Celebrity

This year’s line-up includes former Girls Aloud singer Nadine Coyle, ex-footballer and broadcaster Ian Wright and Radio 1 DJ Adele Roberts.

‘Eating live invertebrates was abuse’

The move has been welcomed by wildlife presenter Chris Packham, who says he’s “very pleased” at ITV’s decision, but describes it as “a first step.”

“I hope this is the start of some significant change,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“What’s long concerned me about the programme is that is portrays animals in the wrong way.

“There was never any ambiguity that eating live invertebrates was abuse and also exploitation for entertainment.”

Chris also criticised the show for stereotyping animals like rats and snakes as “bad organism.”

He also said he thought ITV’s decision was part of a change in global thinking due to the current climate crisis.

“We’re going to have to make changes,” he added.

“That means you and I making changes in our lives, that means TV producers making changes in the way they make their programmes.”

I’m A Celebrity starts on ITV on Sunday evening.

Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 weekdays – or listen back here.





Source link

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Sir Rod Stewart on indyref, Celtic… and model trains

Published

on

By


Sir Rod Stewart has said it would be “a shame” if Scotland became independent when asked about the UK’s political situation.

However, the singer said he would support Scotland leaving the union “if it was good” for the country.

Speaking to BBC Scotland’s The Nine programme, Sir Rod also said he believed Boris Johnson “will sort it out”, when asked about Brexit.

He said: “I’m somewhat of a traditionalist. It would be a shame to see the British isles break up, it would be a shame to see that blue off the Union Jack.

“But if it’s good for Scotland then I’m happy.”

The Forever Young singer also spoke about his love for Celtic, and his amazing model train city which he has been making for 23 years.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending